Bladeless LASIK & Laser Cataract Surgery at Baltimore Washington Eye Center

Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Maryland

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

AMD & Low Glycemic Diet


Does a Low Glycemic Diet Help AMD?
Researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University released a study, published in the journal PNAS, that points to potential biomarkers of AMD. These can be used to predict when a person is at risk for this disease, which is the leading cause of vision loss in adults over the age of 50. Using a mouse research model, the researchers observed that a high–glycemic diet resulted in the development of many Dry AMD features, including loss of function of cells at the back of the eye called retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and of the cells that capture light, called photoreceptors, whereas a low–glycemic diet did not. Importantly, switching from a high–glycemic diet to a low–glycemic diet arrested damage to the retina. The authors of the study suggested that these experimental results may indicate that switching from a high–glycemic diet to a low–glycemic one is beneficial to eye health in people that are heading towards developing AMD.

If you or someone you know has a family history of Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and is over 50 years of age or is a senior who has not had regular eye exams, please schedule and eye exam to help us help you avoid vision loss. Please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 and Turf Valley Town Center, 11089 Resort Road, Suite 206, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Sunday, May 13, 2018

Cataract Surgery Astigmatism Lens Implants


Satisfaction with Cataract Surgery Astigmatism Lens Implants
Good news for patients with astigmatism who are having cataract surgery! When your cataract is removed and replaced with a lens implant to correct your vision, patients who have astigmatism will be pleased to know that satisfaction with cataract lens implants for astigmatism is extremely high. A recent study presented in the American Journal of Ophthalmology compared using toric astigmatism correcting lens implants to a manual incisional procedure for correcting astigmatism, called corneal relaxing incisions. Although both methods of astigmatism correction resulted in good vision for the cataract patients, the astigmatism correcting toric lens implants gave patients better overall satisfaction with their vision, according to a quality of life questionnaire 12 months after their cataract removal with lens implant procedure. Patients were particularly pleased to be able to wear non-prescription sunglasses and be independent of eyeglasses for seeing clearly at distance.

If you or someone you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy or foggy vision, glare, or difficulty with night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 and Turf Valley Town Center, 11089 Resort Road, Suite 206, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Monday, May 7, 2018

“Pink Eye” Antibiotic Overuse for Conjunctivitis




Is Your Doctor Prescribing the Wrong Treatment for Pink Eye?
Based on our own experiences, as well as recommendations of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, you should be aware that non eye care practitioners tend to overprescribe antibiotics for a common eye infection that typically clears up without medication. A recent study suggests that most people with acute conjunctivitis, or pink eye, are getting the wrong treatment. About 60 percent of patients are prescribed antibiotic eyedrops, even though antibiotics are rarely necessary to treat this common eye infection.

About the Pink Eye Conjunctivitis Study
Researchers at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center looked at data from a large managed care network in the United States. They identified the number of patients who filled antibiotic eyedrop prescriptions for acute conjunctivitis. Then they evaluated the characteristics of patients who filled a prescription compared with those who did not. Of approximately 300,000 patients diagnosed with acute conjunctivitis over a 14-year period, 58 percent filled a prescription for antibiotic eye drops. Among them, 20 percent filled a prescription for an antibiotic-steroid combination. Antibiotic-steroid drops are inappropriate for most patients with acute conjunctivitis because it may prolong or exacerbate certain types of viral infection.

Even more troubling, the authors found that the odds of filling a prescription depended more on a patient’s socioeconomic status than the patient's risk for developing a more serious eye infection, i.e. patients who wear contact lenses and those diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.
Pink eye affects 6 million people in the United States each year. There are three types: viral, bacterial, and allergic conjunctivitis. Antibiotics are rarely necessary to treat acute conjunctivitis. Most cases are caused by viral infections or allergies and do not respond to antibiotics. Antibiotics are often unnecessary for bacterial conjunctivitis because most cases are mild and would resolve on their own within 7 to 14 days without treatment.

The study also found:
  • Primary care providers (family physicians, pediatricians, internal medicine physicians, and urgent care providers) diagnose a majority (83%) of patients. Only a minority were diagnosed by eye care providers such as ophthalmologists or optometrists.
  • Patients diagnosed by a primary care or urgent care provider were two to three times more likely to fill prescriptions for antibiotic eye drops than patients diagnosed by an ophthalmologist.
  • Patients who filled antibiotic prescriptions were significantly more likely to be white, younger, better educated, and more affluent than patients who did not fill prescriptions.
The authors say there are several reasons why antibiotics are over prescribed. It is a challenge to differentiate bacterial conjunctivitis from the viral and allergic forms. All three types may have overlapping features, such as a red eye, thin discharge, irritation, and sensitivity to light. Health care providers may tend to “err on the side of caution” and prescribe antibiotics “just in case.” Patients are often unaware of the harmful effects of antibiotics and may falsely believe that antibiotics are necessary for the infection to resolve.

If you or someone you know develops “pink eye” conjunctivitis please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 and Turf Valley Town Center, 11089 Resort Road, Suite 206, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Monday, April 30, 2018

Sarah’s PRK Experience


“On May 5th 2017 I had PRK surgery done to both eyes. Dr. Spagnolo explained everything that was going to happen with the procedure. You will be given step by step instructions of the times to put the drops in and to take the vitamins. I set the alarm in my phone the week prior for all the times so I wouldn’t miss taking the drops. By doing that I never had discomfort or dry eye. Follow everything and things will be great. I love my new eyes!!!” – Sarah S.

If you or someone you know is tired of the hassle of glasses or contact lenses for seeing at distance and would like to find out if LASIK/PRK might be a good vision correction option, please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 and Turf Valley Town Center, 11089 Resort Road, Suite 206, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Exercise Effect on Eye Health & Physiology




Exercise Effect on Eye Health & Physiology
Physical exercise has been known to be one of the most important factors in preventing cardiovascular disorders and may even help prevent some neurodegenerative diseases. A recent review of clinical studies compared the results of various reports regarding the effects of physical exercises on intraocular pressure (IOP), myopia (nearsightedness) and eye circulation and blood flow.

Eye Pressure or Intraocular Pressure (IOP)
Exercises that involve movement, called dynamic exercises, are known to reduce IOP for a brief period after participating. However, certain isometric exercises such a Yoga in “downward” positions may increase IOP.

Myopia or Nearsightedness
There is a solid connection between the time being spent outdoor and reduction in the odds of developing myopia-in fact 2% less odds for every hour spent outdoors!

Eye Circulation
Physical exercises increase retinal blood flow up to 140%, thus providing more blood to retina and stimulating better circulation.

The message is clear-staying fit and active throughout life can be of great long-term benefit to your eyes!  If you or someone you know would like to learn more about exercise and eye health please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 and Turf Valley Town Center, 11089 Resort Road, Suite 206, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Sunday, April 8, 2018

Robert’s & Wanda’s Cataract Stories

“Just in a few words, everything went great! Cannot improve anything, Dr. Betancourt and the staff are #1.”-Robert H

“Dr. Spagnolo is awesome. His staff is very professional and answered any questions I had in a very timely manner. I couldn’t be happier and would recommend Dr. Spagnolo to anyone.”-Wanda R

If you or someone you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy or foggy vision, glare, or difficulty with night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 and Turf Valley Town Center, 11089 Resort Road, Suite 206, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Sunday, April 1, 2018

Flashes & Floaters Need Attention


If you experience flashes of light or suddenly start seeing floaters, it’s best not to ignore these events, but rather to quickly schedule an appointment to see us; although most of the time flashes and floaters are benign, sometimes they can be a sign of a sight threatening problem.

If you have no experienced any trauma to your eye or head, it is often the case that flashes and floaters are due to a Posterior Vitreous Detachment (PVD). PVD is a very common eye condition. It's caused by natural changes to the vitreous gel which fills the space inside the eye. While PVD causes some frustrating symptoms, it doesn’t cause pain, harm the eye, or cause permanent loss of vision. Sometimes, a PVD can be associated with or be a warning sign of retinal tears, which can lead to retinal detachment and vision loss. Retinal detachment must be diagnosed and repaired quickly.

If you experience a sudden onset of flashes and floaters please call us immediately and schedule an appointment so we can examine the vitreous and retina and be sure there are no tears or risks of retinal detachment. Please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 and Turf Valley Town Center, 11089 Resort Road, Suite 206, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.