Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Maryland

Monday, January 19, 2015

Cataracts Cause Night Driving Problems

“With the days being quite short this time of year, we hear patients with cataracts really begin to notice their night driving problems,” commented Andrew Hammer, M.D. “For many patients, the night driving problems from a cataract seem to be the first real symptom they notice when they come in to discuss their decreased vision,” noted Arturo Betancourt, M.D.

Cataract Surgery


About Night Driving Problems with Cataracts
Driving at night is considerably more difficult for most people as dim lighting and darkness can cause you to misjudge distances between cars and the sides of the road. For many patients night driving problems may cause you to begin noticing a general blur of your vision, clouding or hazy vision, dimming of colors and even some double vision-even in daylight. These are symptoms of cataracts that often accompany night driving problems from a cataract. If you find that you don’t really feel comfortable driving at night, it may be that you have the beginning of a cataract. If you experience these symptoms, it would be important to schedule an eye exam and find out for sure. Then, depending on how troubling or unsafe you feel, we will be happy to discuss whether it might well be time to consider whether cataract surgery as an option to help you regain your night driving comfort level.

If you or someone you know feels they have night driving problems that might be related to cataracts or has a question about cataracts, laser cataract surgery or lens implants please feel free to schedule an eye exam by calling Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, visiting Baltimore Washington Eye Center or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061 and River Hill Professional Center, 6100 Day Long Lane, Suite 207, Clarksville, Maryland 21029, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Monday, January 12, 2015

Ocular or Ophthalmic Migraine: What is It?

Ocular or Ophthalmic Migraine might be unfamiliar to a lot of patients. When patients think of the word “migraine” they immediately assume that it is really just about headaches. “We see patients in good general health who tell us that sometimes once or twice a month they see these strange pulsing images in both eyes-both with their eyes open and closed!,” commented Andrew Hammer, M.D. “Sometimes they tell us that they start out small, may last 10-20 minutes and even cause their vision to become blurry,” Dr. Hammer further explained. These episodes actually describe what we know to be an Ocular Migraine-a migraine without a headache! What patients are experiencing is the aura that many sufferers have before the onset of a classic migraine headache.

Symptoms of Ocular or Ophthalmic Migraine
An ocular or ophthalmic migraine often includes seeing zigzag lines, colored lights or flashes of lights expanding to one side of your vision over perhaps 10 to 30 minutes. If you experience these symptoms, in order to be sure that this is not a sign of a more serious problem, you should consider scheduling an evaluation and eye exam with one of the eye doctors at Baltimore Washington Eye Center so that we can rule out any other problems and work in concert with your primary care physician or a neurologist to make sure that other testing is not needed.

 If you or someone you know is concerned about ocular or ophthalmic migraine you are encouraged to schedule an eye examination at Baltimore Washington Eye Center by calling 800-495-3937, visiting Baltimore Washington Eye Center or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061 and River Hill Professional Center, 6100 Day Long Lane, Suite 207, Clarksville, Maryland 21029, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area. 

Sunday, January 4, 2015

Glaucoma Diagnosis & Treatment Improvements

For those patients with glaucoma or at risk of getting glaucoma, new advances in diagnosis and treatment are thought to lower the chance of vision loss. In fact the risk of blindness from glaucoma has dropped by nearly half according to researchers from Mayo Clinic.

Glaucoma is a condition where the eye does not drain fluid properly, resulting in high pressure in the eye that can damage the optic nerve. In the United States, 2.7 million people age 40 and older have the condition. If left untreated, glaucoma reduces peripheral vision and eventually may cause blindness. According to the Mayo Clinic study, the likelihood of losing sight in one eye was 28 percent for patients diagnosed with glaucoma between 1965 and1980. That number fell to 13.5 percent for patients diagnosed between 1981 and 2000.


“We constantly work and remind patients to have regular eye exams with glaucoma testing at appropriate intervals as this is the best way to detect glaucoma early and initiate treatment as quickly as possible,” remarked Arturo Betancourt, M.D., Medical Director of Baltimore Washington Eye Center. “Further, as necessary, we use our in office advanced diagnostic imaging technology called Optical Coherence Technology (OCT) as well as high resolution digital photography for diagnostic purposes to catch glaucoma as early as possible. This early diagnosis along with in office laser treatments for glaucoma has contributed to our ability to prevent vision loss and blindness from glaucoma,” explained Brad Spagnolo, M.D., Director of Refractive Surgery.

“Patients still have a key role to play here,” noted Dr. Spagnolo. “Early detection is the key to saving sight. Despite these advances, 15 percent of those diagnosed with glaucoma still do go blind. We can’t over emphasize the importance of getting regular eye exams to detect glaucoma in the early stages so that we can prescribe vision preserving treatment as soon as possible,” stressed Dr. Spagnolo.

If you or someone you know is concerned about glaucoma, has any risk factors for glaucoma or needs to schedule a glaucoma eye exam, please feel free to call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061 and River Hill Professional Center, 6100 Day Long Lane, Suite 207, Clarksville, Maryland 21029, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.