Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Maryland

Monday, April 27, 2015

Great Eyeglass Lens Rebate Offer!

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is pleased to offer a rebate through Essilor on eligible products including Crizal®, Varilux® & Transitions® Lenses.

EXPERIENCE Crizal® No Glare Lenses 
Crizal® provides protection against glare, scratches, smudges, dust, water, UV to help you see better, look better and feel better!

EXPERIENCE Varilux® Progressive Lenses
Varilux® Progressive Lenses provide sharp vision without transitions at ANY distance!

EXPERIENCE Transitions® Adaptive Color Changing Lenses
Transitions® help you see life in the best light by changing from light to dark and every shade in between!


Receive a $10, $20 or $30 VISA Prepaid Card by mail after the purchase of 1, 2 or 3 eligible products,
PLUS up to a $60 additional rebate when a 2nd pair of glasses with Xperio UV™ Polarized Lenses is ordered.

Cataract Risk & Osteoporosis

Researchers reporting in the journal Clinical Ophthalmology shared some interesting information regarding an association between cataracts, cataract surgery and osteoporosis. Most people are aware that calcium is an important factor in bone health and the occurrence of osteoporosis. But, it is also important to note that calcium is an important factor in cataract formation. The researchers evaluated the association between osteoporosis and cataracts.
  • The researchers initially found that age, female sex, higher socioeconomic class, smoking, chronic renal failure, hyperthyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel diseases are all associated with an increased prevalence of osteoporosis.
  • Then through careful statistical modeling also found that these factors and osteoporosis are ALL associated with an increased prevalence of cataracts. Thus, they concluded that osteoporosis is associated with the presence of cataracts which may be related to calcium imbalance, hormonal abnormalities, and even a shared genetic predisposition.
If you or someone you know is concerned about osteoporosis and their risk of cataracts, please feel free to contact Baltimore Washington Eye Center by calling 800-495-3937, visiting Baltimore Washington Eye Center or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061 and River Hill Professional Center, 6100 Day Long Lane, Suite 207, Clarksville, Maryland 21029, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area. 

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Dry Eye Help with TearLab®

The eye doctors at Baltimore Washington Eye Center are pleased to be able to help dry eyes with state of the art dry eye test called TearLab® to accurately diagnose and monitor dry eye problems and the effectiveness of treatments they can prescribe. The accurate diagnosis of dry eyes or dry eye disease requires a thorough eye exam with one of the eye doctors at Baltimore Washington Eye Center.

We will ask you to describe your dry eye symptoms and the impact they have on your daily life. Then we will take the time to carefully review your medical history, eye history and eye conditions including any medications that you are taking. Tear osmolarity has been shown to have the best predictive value for diagnosing dry eye disease of any single test. Baltimore Washington Eye Center is an accredited TearLab® Dry Eye Center. The TearLab® Osmolarity Test uses a sophisticated “lab on a chip technology” to test a tiny tear sample to measure the salt content in the tears. We will test both eyes, and will take the highest number of the two tests, to generate your osmolarity number which gives the doctors a meaningful measure of the health and stability of the protective tear film that covers the surface of your eyes.

In addition we will observe your tear production by using a specialized microscopic technique to observe the height of the tear film, as well as a clinical test called a Schirmer Test and may also use specially formulated dyes such as Fluorescein, Lissamine and Rose Bengal to help evaluate the functioning of the various layers of the tear film as well as the underlying surface of the eye. This is not uncomfortable and will not interfere with your vision.

Treatment of Dry Eye Problems
From this information we can determine the severity of the dry eye disease that you suffer from and make necessary treatment recommendations that might include artificial tears, tiny punctal plugs, prescription eye drops such as Restasis®, anti-inflammatory eye drops, antibiotics and even diet supplements. Then using TearLab® we can monitor your progress and make sure you get the help and relief you need.

If you or someone you know is bothered by dry eyes, please feel free to call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061 and River Hill Professional Center, 6100 Day Long Lane, Suite 207, Clarksville, Maryland 21029, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Monday, April 13, 2015

Visors Help Avoid Hockey Eye Injury

Wearing visors for playing hockey can help avoid eye injury. Hockey is a popular sport among those who like to watch sports and is even more popular among middle school, high school and college athletes. Eye injury is a series risk among hockey players and it requires that parents and players take some precautions. Researchers found that wearing visors could cause a four-fold decrease in the risk of eye injuries. The researchers, based at the University of Toronto and Harvard Medical School, examined data from The Sports Network (TSN) and The Hockey News annual visor survey over the last 10 seasons from 2002 to 2013 in the NHL. The data clearly demonstrated that the risk of eye injury is 4.23 times higher for players who do not wear a visor. The study also found that the majority of eye injuries are caused by being hit by the puck (37%) or struck by a high stick (28%) or by a fight or scrum (18%), while the researchers could not identify the cause of injury for 17%. Interesting players without visors had a more aggressive style of play, measured by penalty minutes, hits and fights in a case-control study.

As hockey players develop, grow and get stronger their games and playing style become faster and more intense, and the risks continue to increase-thus it is important to maximize protection. Since the majority of hockey injuries are accidental in nature, it is not good enough for players to try to be more cautious. This study pretty firmly supports the common sense notion that wearing visors goes a long way to decreasing injuries among hockey players.

If you or someone you know plays hockey please share this information with them to help them decrease their risk of hockey eye injury, or please feel free to have them contact us at Baltimore Washington Eye Center by calling 800-495-3937, visiting Baltimore Washington Eye Center or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061 and River Hill Professional Center, 6100 Day Long Lane, Suite 207, Clarksville, Maryland 21029, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area. 

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Preventing Sports Eye Injury

As April is designated Sports Eye Safety Month it is important to be aware of the need to be cautious in preventing sports eye injuries whether you are a weekend recreational athlete or a professional player. Proper eye protection goes a long way to helping athletes avoid sports eye injury. In fact thousands of people are blinded by sports related eye injuries each year. Consider that of the 100,000 eye injuries resulting from sports each year, an estimated 42,000 people are treated in the emergency room, and 13,500 end up legally blind. In fact injuries requiring emergency room treatment from sports equipment-including balls, bats, and rackets-was responsible for:
  • 41 percent of emergency room visits for children age 10 to 14.
  • 25 percent of emergency room visits for people age 15 to 24.
  • 20 percent of emergency room visits for children age 5 to 9.
In addition to injuries from sports equipment, many also suffer eye injuries caused by another player's errant finger or elbow to the eye. Eye injuries resulting from athletic activities can range from corneal abrasions or “scratched corneas” to the more serious, potentially catastrophic and blinding injuries, such as an orbital or eye socket fracture or even a retinal detachment.
90 percent of eye injuries are preventable by wearing protective eyewear!
Tips for Preventing Sports Eye Injury
·         Anyone who plays sports should wear appropriate eye protection that meet the standards of the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM), such as polycarbonate lenses or masks, even if the organization, association team or league does not officially require it.
  • People who wear contacts or glasses should also wear appropriate protective eyewear, as contacts offer no protection and glasses are not sufficient protection since lenses may shatter when hit by a projectile.
  • To preserve the vision they have left, all functionally one-eyed athletes – those with one normal eye and the other eye with less than 20/40 vision, even when corrected with glasses or contacts – should wear appropriate eye protection for all sports.
  • Functionally one-eyed athletes and those who have had an eye injury or surgery should not participate in boxing or full-contact martial arts because of the high risk of additional serious injury that could lead to blindness.
  • For sports in which a facemask or helmet with eye protector or shield must be worn, such as football and lacrosse, it is strongly recommended that functionally one-eyed athletes also wear sports goggles that conform to the requirements of ASTM F803.
  • Sports eye protection should be replaced when damaged or yellowed with age, as they may have become weakened and are no longer protective.    
If you or someone you know has questions about preventing sports eye injury or protective eyewear, they are encouraged to contact Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, visiting Baltimore Washington Eye Center or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061 and River Hill Professional Center, 6100 Day Long Lane, Suite 207, Clarksville, Maryland 21029, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.