Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Maryland

Monday, August 28, 2017

Glaucoma Impacts Driving Safety



Driving Safety & Glaucoma
Moderate or advanced glaucoma can affect driving safety according to research noted in the American Journal of Ophthalmology. Patients with bilateral moderate or advanced glaucoma are at risk for unsafe driving. For this reason we now suggest a very careful evaluation for those glaucoma patients who might be at risk so that we can evaluate driving safety of these patients. Glaucoma, especially in more advanced stages can reduce peripheral vision as well as contrast and make driving particularly difficult-especially in dim illumination. Our goal is to help all patients avoid vision loss from glaucoma by asking that you schedule regular eye examinations with glaucoma testing as often your eye doctor suggests. This will depend on the overall health of your eyes, your family history, your general health and many other glaucoma risk factors your eye doctor may identify. The key to preventing vision loss from glaucoma is early detection, diagnoses and treatment.

If you or someone you know would like to schedule and eye exam and glaucoma testing, please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 and Turf Valley Town Center, 11089 Resort Road, Suite 206, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Patient Experiences with Cataract Lens Implants

Dr. Betancourt & Dr. Spagnolo offer cataract surgery with the option of using Advanced Technology Implants to maximize a patient’s vision. Here are a few of our patients’ personal experiences with cataract surgery using Advanced Technology lenses.

Judy writes:
“I was relaxed, personnel were very nice and helpful.  I would recommend Baltimore Washington Eye Center to others. I got the Multifocal lens and do not have to wear glasses after using them for 68 years.  I read a lot and it is so wonderful to put the glasses away forever!”

Charles writes:
“It was quick, painless and I could see so much better.  Colors were so bright and white was white.  The staff was so courteous and thoughtful.  The entire experience was very pleasant.”

Mabel writes:
“The surgery center is convenient; the staff is friendly and very professional. There was not pain or discomfort during or after the surgery.  I was able to go back to work the next day right after my morning appointment with the doctor.  Vision improvement started immediately and continued improving each day for a couple of weeks.”

Paul W. writes:
“After several years of declining ability to correct my vision, Dr. Spagnolo recommended that I have cataract surgery.  I had a standard lens in one eye and due severe astigmatism, had an advanced technology toric lens in the other. The surgery was simple and painless, just following instructions for post-op drops in eye. Despite wearing glasses since High School, I now have 20/20 vision. I recommend Baltimore Washington Eye Center to all my friends.”

Anonymous writes: 
“Very easy surgery-a piece of cake! Every question I had was answer. The staff was a joyful experience. I will recommend to anyone facing eye surgery.”

If you or some you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy foggy vision, glare or difficult night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 and Turf Valley Town Center, 11089 Resort Road, Suite 206, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Baltimore Eye Doctors Recommend Solar Eclipse Eye Safety


On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun, or a “solar eclipse.” “When you see this phenomenon, you will quickly appreciate that it is one of nature’s most awe-inspiring sights. However, it must be viewed safely and certain precautions are necessary so as not to be exposed to potentially serious eye injury,” commented Arturo Betancourt, M.D., Medical Director of Baltimore Washington Eye Center. 

What is a Solar Eclipse?
During a solar eclipse the moon will pass between the sun and the earth, actually blocking the sun either partially or completely depending on where you are viewing it from. The blocking of the sun will last for up to three hours from beginning to end depending on your viewing location. The last time the contiguous U.S. saw a total eclipse was in 1979. This event turns day into night and makes the normally hidden solar corona-the sun’s outer atmosphere- visible! Bright stars and planets will become visible as well. This is one of nature’s most awesome sights. In the Baltimore, Maryland area, we will have a partial eclipse, about 83%. The start time is 1:18 pm, the maximum eclipse view will be at 2:42 pm, with the end of the event occurring at 4:01 pm.

How Can You See It?
Beware of the risk that viewing a solar eclipse can present if you do not take the necessary eye safety precautions. You never want to look directly at the sun without appropriate protection except during totality. “Retinal burns, called “solar retinitis” or “solar retinopathy” can be produced by direct gazing at the sun. This rather serious problem is caused by the thermal effects of the visible and near infrared rays focused on the pigment structure behind the retina. “We almost never see patients with solar retinopathy because the normal eye will tolerate only fleeting glances at the sunbut it can be fairly common during a solar eclipse,” explained Brad Spagnolo, M.D. of Baltimore Washington Eye Center.

The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or hand-held solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the sun. “To be safe to view a solar eclipse, the eclipse gasses must meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for such products,” explained Dr. Spagnolo.

To learn more, please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, visit Baltimore Washington Eye CenterGoogle+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.