Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Maryland

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Early Detection of Juvenile Diabetic Retinal Problems


Diabetic retinopathy is best managed when detected and diagnosed early. This can be especially important for children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. The earlier we can detect and diagnose their diabetic eye problems, the more likely we can help prevent vision loss. Most often diabetic retinopathy is diagnosed during a dilated exam of the retina during an eye exam. However, we also have a very sensitive non-invasive “kid friendly” imaging system in our office called Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) that can help us detect the very earliest types of changes from diabetes, even before they might be visible during a dilated retinal exam.

According to a clinical study reported in the journal Ophthalmic Surgery, Laser and Imaging Retina, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus causes a degenerative effect on certain nerve cells in the retina even before the breakdown of blood vessels occurs with diabetic retinopathy. From this research, it is thought that OCT may be more useful than just a dilated retinal exam in kids with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

If you or someone you know has a child or young adult with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, please make sure they are having regular eye exams, but also so that we might perform an OCT as part of their care. If you have questions or wish to schedule an appointment please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Sunday, October 7, 2018

Is LASIK Safe after 65?


LASIK is safe, effective and convenient type of laser vision correction for those wanting freedom from the hassle of glasses and contacts. But sometimes patients think they might just be too old for LASIK. While the best way to correct both distance vision and the near vision focusing problem-presbyopia, is with lens implants for vision correction, a recent study clearly supports that even at age 65, LASIK is still safe and effective. Reporting in the journal International Ophthalmology  eye surgeons found that even though elder patients may present greater LASIK restrictions due to lens cataract and other eye age-related changes, patients 65 years of age and older that were good candidates LASIK achieved safe, predictable and effective vision and eye health results.

If you or someone you know is thinking about the freedom of seeing clearly without glasses or contact lenses and is concerned about whether their age might be a problem, please schedule an appointment so we can help find out if you might be a candidate for LASIK or lens implants for vision correction. Just call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061 and 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Monday, October 1, 2018

Eye Health Tips for College Students


Going to college and perhaps living in a dormitory can be an exciting and hectic time for students. But, it’s worth mentioning some common sense tips to preserve eye health and avoid eye problems for college students. College students can be susceptible to a host of vision and eye problems such as injury, infection and increased nearsightedness that can be avoided with a little bit of “smarts” and awareness.

Don't Shower or Swim with Contact Lenses. Acanthamoeba is a parasite that lives in water and can cause a rare but serious eye infection called Acanthamoeba keratitis. According to the CDC, 85 percent of Acanthamoeba eye infections occur in contact lens wearers, one of the main risks being exposure of lenses to water. To avoid this dangerous infection, do not wear contact lenses in showers, hot tubs or when swimming in lakes or pools. Also, never use water to clean or store contact lenses; only use sterile contact lens disinfecting solution and a clean contact lens case.  

Get Out. We all want you to get good grades, but spending much of their time studying indoors, puts you at risk of becoming more nearsighted, or myopic. A recent study found that more than 50 percent of college graduates are nearsighted, with vision worsening for each year in school. Other research shows that spending more time outdoors can protect vision from getting worse. Take a break-get outside when possible.

Wash Your HandsConjunctivitis, or “pink eye” spreads really fast in schools and dorms. We know of a report where an outbreak struck more than 1,000 Ivy League college students! Avoid rubbing the eyes and wash hands with soap to avoid catching and spreading pink eye, not to mention other infections.

Give Your Eyes a Break. Dry eye from intense long hours of computer or video display terminal use can be a real problem for college students. To help avoid dry eye symptoms of burning, gritty, red eyes, follow the 20-20-20 rule. Look at something 20 feet away every 20 minutes for 20 seconds. Because dry eye can also cause painful corneal ulcers, which are open sores on the front part of the eye, blink regularly and fully to keep eyes moist.  

Don't Share Makeup. Harmless as it may seem, sharing makeup is a surefire way to spread infection such as herpes keratitis among friends. Infection-causing bacteria grow easily in creamy or liquid eye makeup. Stick to your own makeup and throw it away after three months. If you develop an eye infection, immediately toss all of your eye makeup.  

Stay in the Game. Did you know that nearly 1 in 18 college athletes will get an eye injury playing sports? Common injuries, like scratches on the eye surface and broken bones near the eye socket, happen most often in high-risk sports such as baseball, basketball and lacrosse. Athletes should consider wearing polycarbonate sports glasses to help keep stray balls and elbows from hitting their eyes.

In college, taking care of your eye health may be the last thing on your mind, but we wanted to share some common sense tips. If you or someone you know experiences an eye health or vision problem please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 and Turf Valley Town Center, 11089 Resort Road, Suite 206, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042, serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.