Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Maryland

Sunday, January 27, 2019

Closed Angle Glaucoma Diagnosis Improvements


Closed Angle Glaucoma Diagnosis with Machine Learning Artificial Intelligence
Closed Angle Glaucoma is a sight threatening medical emergency that can cause catastrophic vision loss in a short time if not treated quickly. It is possible to use a number of tests during your eye exam to determine whether you might be at risk. If you are, we can provide an in office laser treatment to easily decrease your risk of Closed Angle Glaucoma. One of these tests is Optical Coherence Tomography, also called AS-OCT short for Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography which allows us to create digital images that are cross-sectional pictures of the eyes’ anterior chambers. Researchers are now developing a fully automated database for screening for AS-OCT screening for Closed Angle Glaucoma using machine learning artificial intelligence that will make the diagnosis very reliable and consistent and readily performed by our staff as part of your eye exams if you are at risk.

If you are someone you know has not had a recent eye exam and glaucoma testing please schedule an appointment at Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, and 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Monday, January 21, 2019

Karen’s and Lucenna’s Cataract Patient Stories



“I have been really pleased with my treatment and the results. Everyone at Baltimore Washington Eye is caring and helpful. Dr. Spagnolo explained the steps to me and made me at ease about the surgery. During the surgery, everyone in the surgery center had me at ease. Great place!”
-Karen K. had Laser Cataract Surgery with a Toric Implant for Astigmatism

“Dr. Betancourt did my cataract surgery. I am so please with the Multifocal IOL Implant he recommended….the staff is so friendly and caring that they made sure I understood the procedure and answered my questions. I am just so pleased with everything.”
-Lucenna H. had Laser Cataract Surgery with a Multifocal Implant

If you or some you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy foggy vision, glare, or difficult night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please call Baltimore Washington Eye Center at 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, and 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Pterygia “Surfer’s Eye” & Melanoma Skin Cancer Risk


Does a Pterygium or "Surfer's Eye" Increase Melanoma Risk?

A pterygium (pronounced “tuh-RIJ-ee-uhm”) is an elevated, wedged-shaped bump of tissue on your eyeball that starts on the sclera or white of your eye-most often on the side near your nose and can extend to the cornea. Although a pterygium is commonly referred to as "surfer's eye" because being around bright sunlight for long periods of time-particularly the harmful UV reflected light from water such as the ocean-can increase your risk. But, there are other causes as well and you don't have to be a surfer or ever see the ocean to get a pterygium. Ultraviolet radiation from the sun appears to be the primary cause for the growth of pterygia, but exposure to dust and wind along with dry eye disease are very common causes. Pterygia usually develop in 30- to 50-year-olds, and are rarely are found in children. If you have a light skin complexion and light eyes you have a greater chance of getting a pterygium.

Recently, researchers reporting in the British Journal of Ophthalmology reported the results of a study that considered whether people who had pterygia were at greater risk of melanoma skin cancer. They felt that since pterygia seemed to me more common in light skinned, light eyed people who were exposed to a lot of sunlight, that maybe they had greater melanoma skin cancer risk. They found that having a pterygium indicates a significantly increased risk of developing a melanoma of the skin and that eye care providers who see patients with developing pterygia should advise these patients of this increased risk and recommend regular skin surveillance with a dermatologist. Further, we know that if a pterygium becomes inflamed and affects the cornea, excision- pterygium surgery-may be necessary to avoid vision changes from corneal distortion or even scarring.

If you or someone you know has a pterygium, please schedule an eye exam at Baltimore Washington Eye Center 800-495-3937, or visit Baltimore Washington Eye Center, Google+ or facebook.com/baltimorewashingtoneyecenter.

Baltimore Washington Eye Center is a leading eye care practice with office locations at 200 Hospital Drive, Suite 600, Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061, and 2391 Brandermill Blvd., Suite 200, Gambrills, Maryland 21061 serving the greater Baltimore and Washington, D.C. area.